BVN vs. CAPS: A Visual Perspective

BVN+vs.+CAPS%3A+A+Visual+Perspective

“I think CAPS has a much nicer facility and much nicer technology and equipment,” teacher Jim Johnson said*. “I think every student’s parents contribute on a per capita basis to their kid’s education, and I think all resources should be equal.”

Educators across the building are beginning to share Johnson’s sentiment because they see a disparity between the facilities at CAPS and the facilities at BVN. Teachers believe that CAPS has received more funding in terms of technology and resources.

“There seems to be an imbalance between the two as far as technology and what we see as teachers in terms of students, class sizes and flexibility. It just seems to be unfair on a number of accounts,” teacher Peggy Smith* said.

A quick tour through the CAPS building can demonstrate that it has many resources and technologies the high schools don’t have, like modern 3D printers [opposed to the basic model printer at BVN], a human simulator, advanced medical lab equipment and a cockpit from a decommissioned plane donated by Garmin.

“I wish we had some of the basic lab equipment [at North] that we have here [at CAPS], the reason for this though is that it takes forever to learn how to use that equipment, and it’s not financially feasible to get a bunch of equipment that like 15 kids are gonna use at the high school,” Senior and selected student CAPS representative Muriel Eaton said.  “Even in research classes, there are only 10 of us that are at that [academic] level that will use the micro-pipettes, the quantifier and the PCR machines.”

Teachers, however, believe that there should be a level playing field for all kids.

“Those kids spend half of their time at North and they are not good enough to have that technology when they are here, but when they take the trip down Metcalf, suddenly they become smart enough,” Johnson said. “It makes no sense at all, it is ridiculous.”

Regardless of teachers’ opinions, the district and students at CAPS maintain that the program is a catalyst for inspiration and something that is here to stay.

“Everyone here loves what they are doing,” Eaton said. “You are able to shine and use your strengths.”

*Names have been changed to protect the identity of the persons quoted.

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– Vijay Ramasamy